"Lija's Tears"
"Lija's Tears", 2013, Glazed Terracotta, Laminated glass, Monofilament, and Epoxy, 96" by 15"by 15"
"Today's Bliss"
"Today's Bliss", 2010, Glazed porcelain with lusters and Gold over glaze.
"Magnolia"
"Magnolia", 2010, Glazed Porcelain, 108" x 24" x 12"
"Shiva's Tears"
"Shiva's Tears", 2008, Glazed Terra Cotta, Copper, 108" x 24" x24"
"Mesopotamian Landscape"
"Mesopotamian Landscape", 2008, Glazed Terra Cotta with Gold overglaze, Cording, 108" x 20" x 20"
"Beirut/Baghdad"
"Beirut/Baghdad", 2006, Glazed Terra Cotta, 108" x 18" x 18"
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The general title for these Architectural Ceramic works, "Column of Tears" comes   from an actual Byzantine column located in the cistern of Istanbul, Turkey. 

When I first saw the column 2001 the image triggered an emotional response in me, but it wasn't until I saw my aunt in Prague during an electrical rain-storm and   power outage that I knew that I must work with these forms.

My own personal obsession with tears since childhood related, I think, to a disjointed family history with roots in politics and culture. It was revived during this meeting in 2004. The tears flowed nonstop. And it seemed that the natural world set the stage for this body of work that is both personal and public.     

In Greek architecture each column represents a specific person or state

 

In my work each column represents a specific emotional response to a   political event, personal experience or memory.

The capital of the column   creates the context while the drops form the flutes of the column and the base   grounds the sculpture.

The clay drops initially referring to tears have   become oil, blood, sweat, buds, pods; the essence of the man, nature, heaven and   hell.

Some of the pieces are more like chandeliers or mobiles but I still refer   to them as columns since their origin is the column

 

Each drop is individually created by hand -- no molds are used. 

Other   elements are sometimes used to inform the work

I use a variety of clay, glazes and overglazes to bring life to these ceramic pieces.

© 2016 by Olivia Beens

Email: oliviabeens@gmail.com

Photo Credits:

Sherman Sussman

Regina Cherry

Chris Bolton

Seth Rubin

Peteris Krumins